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Psychology

PSYCH 229


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Credit Hours

(4-0) 4 Cr. Hrs.

Section Start Dates


Section NoStart Date
142133August 25, 2014
142134August 25, 2014
142154August 25, 2014
142308August 25, 2014
142330August 25, 2014
142409September 16, 2014

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Life-Span Developmental Psychology


Course Description

Human development from conception through death is examined. Biological, cognitive and psychosocial development topics are explored with an understanding of the theories and research findings across the life-span.

Prerequisites

(A requirement that must be completed before taking this course.)

Course Competencies

Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  • Summarize the contributions and criticisms of the major developmental theories and theorists.
  • Examine common mistakes made in the interpretation of research.
  • Examine the benefits of prenatal care.
  • Explain the nutritional needs of infants.
  • Differentiate three theories of language learning, and current views on language learning.
  • Explain the main developments in the emotional life, including attachment theory, of the child between 6 months and 2 years.
  • Discuss the major characteristics of Piaget's stage of preoperational thought.
  • Explain the symptoms and treatment of specific mental health related disorders affecting, children, adults and the elderly.
  • Examine the special problems of bullies and their victims and possible ways of helping such children.
  • Explain the development of the brain during adolescence.
  • Interpret the use and misuse of prescription medications when treating children, adults and the elderly.
  • Explain the psychosocial and biosocial development of adolescence, adulthood and the elderly.
  • Interpret the relationship between health and certain lifestyle factors and measures for increasing health during middle adulthood.
  • Examine changes in memory, attention and learning in adulthood.
  • Evaluate changes in cognition, and emotion in adulthood.
  • Evaluate religious and cultural variations in how death is viewed and treated.
  • Examine the contributions of gerontology to changing views about old age.
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